Jonathan Bixby Posts

Salary vs. Equity: How to Calculate Founder Compensation (Part 2)

Salary vs. Equity: How to Calculate Founder Compensation (Part 2)

In a previous post, we shared our approach to handling the salary variable in the salary vs. equity equation for compensating the entrepreneurs we select to be our co-founders. This week, let’s talk about the equity side.

Salary vs. Equity: How to Calculate Founder Compensation (Part 1)

Salary vs. Equity: How to Calculate Founder Compensation (Part 1)

Figuring out how to fairly compensate the founders we work with has proven to be a complicated question. We’re trying to strike a balance between providing a salary that makes it possible to live in Vancouver during early-stage development, and equity, which could someday represent considerable wealth, but won’t put food on the table in the short term. We’ll deal with equity in a later post, but for now I’d like to talk about figuring out the salary part of the equation.

How Much Influence Should a Startup Studio Have on the Companies It Creates?

How Much Influence Should a Startup Studio Have on the Companies It Creates?

We care a lot about culture. We think it’s one of the cornerstones of a successful startup. When we were operating Strangeloop, we made culture a top priority. We did all the usual things you see in tech — parties, breakfasts, ping pong — but it was our effort to operate with a relatively flat organizational structure that ensured we had a happy, productive team. We must have been doing something right, because we won BC Business’s “best company to work for” award five years in a row.

Moving forward, we want to make sure that culture is a priority in any company we create. 

Why a Startup Studio?

Why a Startup Studio?

Early in 2013, my brother Josh and I, along with our business partner Mike Benna, exited Strangeloop Networks after its sale to Radware, a Tel Aviv-based application delivery and security company. Stressed and exhausted, we were all ready for a much-needed break. The plan was to take a year off, but sometime around the six-month mark, I started to feel a nagging urge to get back to work.

So, once or twice a week, Josh, Mike, and I would meet up at the Vancouver Convention Centre and take a 90-minute walk around Stanley Park to talk about the things we loved about our last business, what we hated, and what we should do next.